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Radiation Damage in DNA Structure/Function Relationships at Early Times by

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Published by Battelle Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Science,
  • Radiation,
  • Dna (Deoxyribonucleic Acid),
  • Radiogenetics,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life Sciences - Cytology,
  • DNA,
  • Congresses,
  • Effect of radiation on

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsAlfred F. Fuciarelli (Editor), John D. Zimbrick (Editor)
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages451
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8392454M
ISBN 100935470905
ISBN 109780935470901

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DNA Damage Overview Radiation may damage any of the components of DNA: Ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) typically causes base damage, such as 8-oxo-G and pyrimidine dimers For therapeutic radiation, damage to DNA is caused by energy deposition along the track Damage from spur and blob Base damage: >/cell. Radiation-Induced Damage in Chromosomal DNA Molecules: Deduction of Chromosomal DNA Organization from the Hydrodynamic Data Used to Measure DNA Double-Strand Breaks and from Stereo Electron Microscopic Observations Christopher S. . Understanding Radiation Biology: From DNA Damage to Cancer and Radiation Risk - CRC Press Book This book provides a qualitative and quantitative exploration of the action of radiation on living matter which leads to a complete and coherent interpretation of radiation biology.   It takes readers from radiation-induced molecular damage in the nucleus of the cell and links this damage to cellular effects such as cell killing, chromosome aberrations and mutations before exploring organ damage, organism lethality and cancer : Kenneth Chadwick.

It takes readers from radiation-induced molecular damage in the nucleus of the cell and links this damage to cellular effects such as cell killing, chromosome aberrations and mutations before exploring organ damage, organism lethality and cancer induction. Newer areas in this edition include the role of DNA repair in chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, radiation DNA damage, Fanconi anemia cross-link repair, translesion DNA polymerases, BRCA1-BRCA2 pathway for HR and synthetic lethality, and . Principles of Radiation Interactions Base changes: Bases can be damaged or destroyed or chemically modified by radiation. Hydroxyl radical and byproducts can add to bases. Pyrimidines (T, C) more sensitive than purines. The biological significance of base damage is less than that of strand damage. Effects of radiation on DNA Page 8 of   II. Effects of Radiation on the DNA Synthetic Period III. Radiation Effects on DNA Precursor Metabolism and DNA Synthesis IV. Possible Mechanisms Associated with Radiation-Induced Depression of DNA Synthesis V. Ionizing Radiation and RNA Metabolism in the Cultured Mammalian Cell References UV Damage at the Transcriptional Level I. Introduction Edition: 1.

New mechanisms for radiation damage in ion-beam irradiated DNA. Role of excited states in DNA damage: experimental and theoretical results. The role of trapped free radicals in strand break formation. Low-Energy Electron Pathways. Introduction. Electron spin resonance experiments in ion-beam irradiated samples. Strand breaks in plasmid DNA via. The radiation could prevent the DNA from replicating correctly. The radiation could damage the DNA so badly that the cell dies. This is called apoptosis. One dead cell is not a big problem. After all, millions of your cells die every day. But if too many cells die at once, the organism could also die. What is DNA? Every one of your cells contains deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). This important molecule is like your . Ultraviolet Radiation Damage in DNA R. J. H. Davies Division of Biochemistry, School of Biology and Biochemistry, Medical Biology Centre, Queen’s University, Belfast BT9 7BL, Northern Ireland, U.K. Introduction The evolution of most forms of life has occurred in an environment exposed to . Ionizing radiation, the type of radiation released by radioactive materials, also contributes to DNA mutation. Like UVB, ionizing radiation causes direct DNA damage that lead to mutations. Exposure ionizing radiation leads to double-stranded breaks in DNA, so both parts of the DNA molecule are broken at the same spot.